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Joint Small Hydro and Cogeneration Projects Launch and Capacity Building Workshop

Organized by UNEP-GEF, AfDB, REEEP, EATTA and AFREPREN/FWD

8th November 2007 at UNEP Headquarters Complex, Gigiri in Nairobi, Kenya



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Launch in the Media

 
 

Projects Launch In the Media

AFP: UNEP aims to generate power in African sugar and tea farmlands
All Africa: UN Environment Agency Announces New Projects to Boost Clean Energy
KBC: Project expected to add 120megawatts to the national grid
Prensa Latina: UNEP: New Projects to Generate Energy
DPA: Clean energy projects set for African tea and sugar industries
East African Standard: Kenya: Sh6.7 Billion Electricity Projects Launched

Business iafrica: Moz to benefit from energy project

AFP: UNEP aims to generate power in African sugar and tea farmlands
(Also appears in Africa Asia)
09/11/2007 00:01 NAIROBI, Nov 8 (AFP)

The UN Environment Programme on Thursday launched two projects to generate small-scale electric power from wastes in the tea and sugar plantations in eastern and southern Africa.

The 100-million-dollar projects, funded by the Global Environmental Facility (GEF), are expected to benefit 18 million farmers in some 11 countries.
The tea and sugar projects aim to generate 10 and 82 megawatts respectively in their initial phases with ambitions to increase production, the Nairobi-based UNEP said in a statement.

"These two new UNEP-led projects showcase the multiple benefits sustainable development can have for rural areas, offering social, economic and environmental benefits that help locally and globally," GEF chief Monique Barbut said in the statement.
Some 40 percent of electricity needs in the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius are met by waste by-products from the sugar industry.

"By relying on low-cost, renewable indigenous fuels such as sugar byproducts and offcuts from the timber industry, these cogeneration units will cut greenhouse gas emissions and reduce energy costs for the region's agro-processing and forest industries," the statement said.


All Africa: UN Environment Agency Announces New Projects to Boost Clean Energy
UN News Service (New York) - 8 November 2007 -Posted to the web 8 November 2007

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) today announced the launch of a pair of projects worth some $100 million in the tea and sugar industries designed to boost the use of clean energy and stimulate development in Africa.
Both projects aim to develop new forms of local energy generation to help rural areas overcome poverty, cut dependency on imported and expensive fossil fuels, and contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, UNEP said in a news release.

The tea initiative, which will deliver small-scale hydro-electric power to plantations across East Africa, is expected to reach over 8 million people in the tea industry. Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia are among the countries which have already endorsed the initiative.

"Tea is known to be good for you; now it is also getting better for the environment," said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner.
He also hailed the decision by some countries in East Africa to establish power purchase agreements, which are contracts that allow unconventional generators of electricity to sell surplus power back to the grid, saying it "has opened up a raft of new opportunities for cleaner and renewable energy generation."
In a separate but related initiative, a project funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) will help farmers use waste from the sugar industry to generate electricity - a move UNEP said will fuel sustainable economic growth.

The project aims to reach approximately 10 million sugar farmers and their dependants in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda and Tanzania.
The sugar initiative builds on the successes achieved in Mauritius, where up to 40 per cent of the country's electricity needs are met by waste by-products from the sugar industry, UNEP said.


KBC: Project expected to add 120megawatts to the national grid
Written By: VPPS , Posted: Thu, Nov 08, 2007

An ambitious project through which tea and sugar companies will use local materials to generate alternative sources of energy was inaugurated on Thursday.
The project, which is a joint effort between the government, European Union, UNEP and other development partners, was launched at UNEP's headquarters, Gigiri by Vice President Moody Awori who represented President Mwai Kibaki.

It involves the utilization of by-products of sugar as well as micro-hydroelectricity generation projects and targets to transform the lives of millions of Kenyans.
Once operational, the project is expected to add 120megawatts to the national grid besides supplying the factories with adequate operation power.
The President, in a speech read on his behalf by Awori, welcomed the project noting that with the rising cost of oil in the world market, there was need to develop alternative sources of energy.

He cited geothermal, solar, wind and sugar bagane-based co-generation, which he noted, is easily achievable in the continent.
President Kibaki said the high cost of oil has raised the production costs of agriculture thus adversely lowering the farmer incomes and reducing the global competitiveness of market for the products.

He added that the projects will go a long way in addressing the energy needs in both industries, while diversifying power supply in the region and reducing the green house gas emissions.
The President noted that tea and sugar companies have continued to contribute to the economy of the country and other Eastern and Southern African countries over the last 30 years.

" In Kenya and Burundi for instance, tea accounts for about 20% of total national exports while sugar contributes significant proportions of the export earning for countries such as Swaziland and Mauritius", the President observed, adding that the tea industry impacted on the lives of about 3million people and provided employment to 800,000 people in Kenya.

The President said that in Africa, since less that 10% of rural populations had access to electricity, the installation of the small hydropower and cogeneration facilities would address the need.

President Kibaki expressed optimism at the success of the project noting that already six factories in Kenya had indicated willingness to adopt the new technology.
He called on financial institutions and governments in the region to support initiatives towards renewable energy projects.

The President particularly urged the governments to develop the necessary policy and regulatory frameworks toll facilitate investments in renewable energy developments.

The Head of European Union (EU) Delegation to Kenya Mr. Eric Van Linden assured that EU will continue her partnership with African governments.
He disclosed that EU would fund 75 such projects in Africa six of them in Kenya as one way of poverty alleviation initiative in Africa.

Among those present were Minister of Natural Resources and Energy of Swaziland, Ms Dumsile Sukati, Minister of State for Energy of Uganda, Mr. Simon D'ujanga, Assistant Minister for Agriculture, Patrick Muiruri and Diplomats.


Prensa Latina: UNEP: New Projects to Generate Energy

United Nations, Nov 8 (Prensa Latina)

The UN Environment Program announced new projects Thursday for the industries of tea and sugar, designed to use clean energy and boost development in Africa.
Both initiatives, valued at 100 million dollars, are aimed at developing new forms of generation of local energy.

According to UNEP sources, this would bring rural regions out of poverty, eliminating the dependency on expensive and imported oil, and would contribute to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The project for the tea industry, which would offer energy through small hydroelectric to plantations of eastern Africa, could benefit eight million people in Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia.
UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner expressed that tea, commonly accepted as good for people's health, now will also improve the environment.

Another initiative will help to use the wastes of the sugar industry to generate electricity, which UNEP experts consider will cause a sustainable economic growth.
That project will benefit 10 million sugar farmers and their families in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda and Tanzania.
 


DPA: Clean energy projects set for African tea and sugar industries

(Also appears in Monster and Critics)
Nov 8, 2007, 14:46 GMT - Nairobi -

The United Nations announced two projects Thursday meant to make tea and sugar industries in Africa environmentally friendly by introducing small-scale energy appliances that would allow farmers in seven African countries to access clean power.

Using hydropower plants in tea plantations and turning the waste produced by sugar cane into power, the UN's Environment Programme (UNEP) said the new projects will help reduce greenhouse gasses while spreading clean energy to rural areas in East and Southern Africa.
'Tea is known to be good for you, now it is also getting better for the environment,' UNEP's executive director Achim Steiner said in a statement.

Based on the success of the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius, which meets close to 40 per cent of its electricity needs through what is called cogeneration, UNEP said sugar cane plantations in countries from Kenya to Malawi have the potential to reuse their waste.

'Seven million Kenyans are directly or indirectly impacted by the sugar sector. If we provide electricity and it's a more reliable supply we can transform nearly a third of this country's population,' said Stephen Karekezi, the head of AFREPREN, a local energy research group supporting the projects.

Some 8 million tea farmers could benefit from the greening initiative, which would see the African Development Bank provide loans to small-scale farmers to purchase hydropower plants or in the case of sugarcane, the hardware to turn the waste into energy.

UNEP said the payback time for the loans would be up to seven years, during which farmers could sell the surplus energy they produce to the surrounding community, at a cheaper price and more stable service than grid power.

The idea is being piloted in Kenya and Uganda and supporters say they hope curious farmers will be inspired to acquire their own clean energy plant.

Most Africans make a living off small-scale farming yet live in rural areas usually not connected to the grid or else constantly facing power shortages.
Africa is the least responsible for the effects of climate change but is least prepared to deal with what could be its devastating consequences.

The new projects, set to cost 100 million dollars, come ahead of the UN's meeting on climate change in Bali, Indonesia, in December, where environment ministers from around the world are set to begin negotiations on a post-Kyoto emissions reduction plan.


East African Standard: Kenya: Sh6.7 Billion Electricity Projects Launched

9 November 2007  - Wandera Ojanji - Nairobi

The United Nations Environment Programme (Unep) has launched two projects to help the tea and sugar industries generate electricity.

The Small Hydro for Greening Tea Industry in East Africa project will see the tea sector produce 10mw from small-scale hydro projects. This would later increase to 82mw.
And through the co-generation for Africa project, sugar factories are expected to initially generate 60mw. Production would then be upgraded to generate 200mw.
Welcoming the Sh6.7 billion initiative on Thursday, President Kibaki acknowledged the high cost of energy in the sugar and tea production.

"Small hydro-electricity generation will reduce the tea industries' energy cost, enhance global competitiveness and increased revenues," he said.
In a speech read on his behalf by Vice-President, Mr Moody Awori, the President noted that the local sugar industry had the potential to generate up to 190mw of electricity from baggasse.

"The rising cost of oil in the world market is a threat, not only to tea and sugar business, but also to the economies of the region. Apart from raising production costs, this increase translates into lower income for farmers," said Kibaki.
Six sugar factories have indicated willingness to venture into co-generation for their own use and export to national grid.
Global Environmental Facility is financing the projects through the African Development Bank and other partners, including East African Tea Trade Association and Energy, Environment and Development Network for Africa.

The projects are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emission, which has been blamed for global warming.

"They will also enhance the competitiveness of the region's farm and forestry products, boost investment and set the stage for rural electrification," said Unep.
 


Business iafrica: Moz to benefit from energy project

Fri, 09 Nov 2007

Mozambique is among southern and eastern African countries which will benefit from a new $100-million energy project.

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) said in a press release issued on Thursday that the projects would use tea and sugar residues to generate energy.

The project was part of the UN's programme to boost the use of clean energy and stimulate development in Africa.

UNEP said: "Both projects aim to develop new forms of local energy generation to help rural areas overcome poverty, cut dependency on imported and expensive fossil fuels, and contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions."

The tea initiative, which will deliver small-scale hydro-electric power to plantations across East Africa, was expected to reach over eight million people in the tea industry.
'Tea is getting better for environment'

Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia were among the countries which had already endorsed the initiative.

"Tea is known to be good for you; now it is also getting better for the environment, said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner.

He said the project had opened up a raft of new opportunities for cleaner and renewable energy generation.

The sugar project, funded by the Global Environment Facility, under which waste from sugar would be used to generate electricity would help farmers use waste from the sugar industry to generate electricity.

More than 10 million sugar farmers and their dependants in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda and Tanzania were expected to benefit from the project.

According to the UNEP a successful sugar project was implemented in Mauritius, where up to 40 percent of the country's electricity needs were met by waste by-products from the sugar industry.

Sapa

AFREPREN/FWD 2007