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  • Kenya:Report lists Kenya among top in wind energy investment
  • Tanzania: Solar power dominates rural Tanzania, says report
  • South Sudan: AfDB Approves U.S.$14 Million Loan for Juba Power Project
  • Tanzania: 80mw Power Project to Benefit Three Countries
  • Africa:Solutions for Africa’s Energy Crisis More Likely to be Renewable
  • Africa: AFDB discloses a $12bn power plan for Africa
  • Kenya: solar tech market set to rise
  • Morocco's Noor: Capturing the sun to bring light
  • The up-and-coming African solar: Top 50 announced African solar PV projects
  • Kenya Learns to Cook with Solar Power - even when the Sun doesn't Shine
  • African renewable-energy supply could surpass demand by 2030
  • Kenya: Solar Water Pumps to Help Alleviate Drought in Kenya
  • Africa: Providing Sustainable Energy Isn't Just About Gadgets and Dollars
  • Uganda: AfDB supports Uganda’s off-grid master plan
  • Southern Africa: SADC Needs Comprehensive Power Strategy
  • Africa: AfDB Calls for a Revolution in Providing Energy Access Solutions
  • West Africa: BioTherm Wins USTDA Grants for Ghana and Burkina Faso Projects
  • Africa: Renewable energy has robust future in much of Africa
  • Kenya: EU Funding to Help Light Up Kenya
  • Africa: AFD Secures €24 Million from ElectrFI for Africa Projects
  • Uganda to Tap Into Mini-grid Potential
  • East Africa: Lamu, Tana River to Benefit From Sh15.9b Solar Power Project
  • Africa: EU, French Agency Launch Africa’s Renewable Energy Project
  • Ethiopia: Investing in Energy - Promising Development
  • Morocco, Here comes the Sun: Solar Power Finance for the 21st Century
  • Mali to Receive US$25mn Loan to Build Solar Photovoltaic Plant
  • Kenya, Africa’s Green Energy Challenge: Mega Projects, Off-Grid or Somewhere in Between?
  • Morocco: How Morocco tapped into Africa's Renewable Energy Potential
  • Nigeria: Green Energy Tech on the Rise
  • Mali to Receive $25 Million Concessional Loan to Build Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Plant and Transform the West African Energy Market
  • Kenya:Report lists Kenya among top in wind energy investment

    Kenya is among the countries poised to lead in wind energy investment in Africa this year according to a new report.Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), the international trade association for the wind power industry, says Kenya is setting the pace in the region in the use of wind as a renewable source of energy by initiating the generation of 700 megawatts for the national grid.“For the Middle East and Africa, the main drivers will continue to be South Africa, Morocco (and we hope) Egypt, with strong contributions from Kenya and Ethiopia as some of the smaller markets are just getting off the ground,” says GWEC in its latest annual Global Wind Report market update.It notes that at the end of 2016, over 99 per cent of Middle East and Africa region’s total wind energy installations were spread across 10 countries – South Africa, Morocco.


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    Tanzania: Solar power dominates rural Tanzania, says report

    The report, released earlier this week by the National Bureau of Statistics and the Rural Energy Agency shows that grid electricity is the second largest source of power in rural areas with 34.5% of households connected, while solar is leading by nearly 65%. The results show that solar power is the dominant electricity source in rural areas as 64.8% of the rural households were using electricity generated from solar power. Private entity and individual electricity generated from own sources (excluding solar) was the least source of electricity among rural households at 0.6%. According to the Energy Access Situation Report, in general, electricity access (to any form of electricity) in rural areas has improved from 6.1% in 2011 to 16.9% in 2016. One general observation from this data is that more efforts are needed to improve the accessibility of modern energies to rural residents in order to achieve sets of energy targets by 2030 as stipulated in 2015 Energy Policy.


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    Sudan: AfDB Approves U.S.$14 Million Loan for Juba Power Project

    The African Development Bank (AfDB) has approved a $14.57 million supplementary loan for South Sudan's power project.The money will be used to rehabilitate and expand electricity distribution networks in the capital city.Juba lacks a reliable power supply network due to dilapidated infrastructure. Consumers are therefore forced to rely on diesel generators."The project will contribute in reducing inefficiencies in the power distribution network and increase electricity access in Juba," said Gabriel Negatu, AfDB's director- general of the East Africa regional development and business delivery office.


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    Tanzania: 80mw Power Project to Benefit Three Countries

    OVER 7,000 households in Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi are set to benefit from 80 megawatts of electricity from the Rusumo Falls hydro-electric project along Kagera River whose ground-breaking ceremony is set for today.Tanzania's Minister for Energy and Minerals, Prof Sospeter Muhongo and his Rwanda and Burundian counterparts are expected to grace the ground-breaking event scheduled at the Tanzania-Rwanda border. Each partner state will have a share of 26.6MW to be connected to their national power grids.


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    Africa:Solutions for Africa’s Energy Crisis More Likely to be Renewable

    No country has ever reduced poverty without investing substantially in energy. Not only is it central to all human development goals, but it is also central to how we are globally dealing with climate change.Earth Day (20 April) is an important reminder for all South Africans to be cognisant of their country’s energy situation especially now, as the Government is facing several important and life-changing decisions.The South African government made two important announcements: The Department of Mineral Resources said that shale gas fracking in the Karoo would go ahead while the Treasury Department has said they are in the process of deciding whether to move forward with the controversial nuclear deal. While there is a massive energy need on the Continent, does the answer lie in large, slow-moving and expensive solutions that are potentially very damaging to the environment?Community scale renewable energy opportunities and solutions to address Africa’s energy needs will be dealt with at the first annual Energy Revolution Africa event, a co-located event at African Utility Week taking place in Cape Town from 16 – 18 May


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    Africa: AFDB discloses a $12bn power plan for Africa

    The African Development Bank (AFDB) has unveiled plan to invest $12 billion over the next five years under its new electrification programme.The fund will support its New Deal on energy for Africa which aims to achieve universal access to Africa by 2025. The plan was born out of the Energy Week conference held in Abidjan, Ivory Coast in March which brought stakeholders together to discuss methods of improving energy access.Until recently, the AfDB and other organisations regarded off-grid power provision as a stop-gap measure, designed to provide electricity to people until their homes were connected to the grid.


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    Kenya: solar tech market set to rise

    Kenya’s shift to renewable energy sources presents a lucrative and expanding market for solar equipment.This is according to Shenzhen Power Solution Limited Vice-President Susan Lee, who spoke to Xinhua news at an energy and power expo, held in Nairobi."Our main focus [is] in household solar solutions that are affordable but are of high quality. We are scouting for a Kenyan franchise to distribute our products that include solar lanterns, torches and solar study lamps," Lee said.She added that the company has invested in solar solutions that are tailor made for populations that are not connected to power.


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    Morocco's Noor: Capturing the sun to bring light

    Four years ago, Morocco imported 93 per cent of its energy needs. By 2030, it hopes to get 52 per cent from renewables. Just how serious the country is about solar power comes across loud and clear to visitors as soon as one crosses the Mohamed V International Airport here.Large solar panels along the road and street lights topped with solar panels line the way for a few miles -- highlighting how the north African nation is moving firmly ahead in its mission to become a solar superpower.


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    The up-and-coming African solar: Top 50 announced African solar PV projects


    The need for energy and the abundance of sunshine provide strong justifications for adopting solar energy in Africa. The opportunities are rapidly becoming apparent as a range of international investors are planning and constructing large scale solar power plants in the region. Based on the announcement of the top 50 solar PV pipeline, Africa will witness an increase of more than 4 GW in installed solar capacity during the years to come. Our list of Top 50 projects under development comes in preparation for the two-day event in Nigeria during the 25-26 of April. The Solar Future Nigeria concentrates all major stakeholders in the country and addresses all forms of solar applications ranging from utility scale to pico solar.While the number of PV plants under construction have decreased since our previous report due to completion, many projects have been announced since.


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    Kenya Learns to Cook with Solar Power - even when the Sun doesn't Shine


    BUSIA: In this sunny part of Kenya, solar cookers - which trap sunlight to heat food - have surged in popularity in recent years. But a big problem remains: How to cook when the sun doesn't shine?Communities are now starting to sort out solutions, from insulated baskets that hold onto heat after the sun disappears to use of back-up fuel-efficient charcoal and firewood stoves. "Fluctuations in sunshine can hinder cooking using the solar (system) but with the basket we nowadays prepare tea during the day and can drink it after sunset," said Peter Wanga, whose family has been using a solar cooking system since last year.The insulated basket "conserves enough heat to cook food even when there is no sunshine" - and is affordable and easy to use, he said.In Busia County, in western Kenya, as many as 1,500 households have turned to solar cooking, mostly over the last four years, according to county Ministry of Energy figures. Other families have adopted more efficient charcoal or firewood stoves.


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    African renewable-energy supply could surpass demand by 2030


    Just 37% of people in Africa had access to electricity in 2014, with the vast majority living in rural areas. Demand is set to skyrocket, projected to triple 2010 consumptions levels by 2030 (an amount three times that of the U.K.). Renewables make up just one percent of the energy on the continent. Falling costs of solar and wind have driven growth of renewable energy in a few countries yet half of African countries lack even basic estimates of their potential. A new study maps the potential for expansion of wind and solar plants in Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The results, explored in a post on Carbon Brief, are fairly astounding: given the quality and quantity of the resources and other markers of suitability, the potential supply of renewable energy could outstrip demand. By a factor of at least two.


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    Kenya: Solar Water Pumps to Help Alleviate Drought in Kenya


    The Solar Energy Foundation is trying to alleviate drought catastrophes and their consequences, dropping or low crops, in East Africa through the use of solar water pumps for irrigation.In April 2017, 23 of the 47 counties of Kenya were already affected by the drought. The project is aimed at those farmers who suffer particularly from the ongoing drought. In Kenya, the Solar Energy Foundation and local partners are implementing a project to bring solar water pumps to these farmers. After thorough research and a wide range of practical tests, SF1 from Futurepump (UK / India) was chosen by the Solar Energy Foundation. The capacity of the pump is more than 12,000 liters of water per day. It has been developed specifically for the needs of small farmers in Africa and has been successfully used in Uganda and Kenya for several years. The costs for water pump and training of the respective farmer are about €900, which farmers cannot afford. Under the program the pumps are funded by the Revolving Fund, which has been successfully applied by the Solar Energy Foundation in several other East African countries.


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    Africa: Providing Sustainable Energy Isn't Just About Gadgets and Dollars


    Around the world, 1.1 billion people have no electricity and 2.9 billion can't cook with "clean" energy. The international community has big aspirations to tackle this challenge, and its focus is on sustainable energy. This involves providing poor women and men with affordable access to electricity for modern energy services like lighting and communications. The needs also extend to clean cooking options to mitigate the negative health effects of cooking with wood, charcoal, coal or animal waste. Many of these people live in remote locations with no access to electricity grids, or live within reach of the grid but cannot afford to connect. This has led to a focus on the potential of off-grid, renewable energy options.A UN scheme - called the UN Sustainable Energy for All initiative - has set itself the goal of ensuring that everyone in the world has access to sustainable energy for all by 2030.


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    Uganda: AfDB supports Uganda’s off-grid master plan


    Last week Friday, the AfDB’s board of directors approved a project preparation grant of $2.3 million to kick-start future investments in decentralised power systems in rural and urban areas in the east African country. The Bank explained that the grant is being provided by the Scaling–Up Renewable Energy Programme of the Climate Investment Funds, which is managed by the AfDB’s Department of Climate Change and Green Growth. According to the AfDB, the grant will cover the expenses associated with the development of an off-grid master plan for the electrification of a number of islands across Lake Victoria, including feasibility studies for the most viable ones and set the path for future energy investments in the selected islands.Rural electrification rate in sub-Saharan Africa is the lowest in the world, at less than 20%. The electrification of rural areas carries inherent difficulties.Issues such as high costs of capital, low revenue collection rates, and insufficient generation capacity among others, are good examples of difficulties that are severely augmented when the area targeted for electrification is remote and unique in nature.


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    Southern Africa: SADC Needs Comprehensive Power Strategy


    Southern African requires a comprehensive energy strategy covering development of new generation plants and transmission projects to evacuate electricity from sources to ensure sustainable supply to cover the 6 000MW operational power deficit the bloc is facing. The operational deficit comes at a time when the region has adopted an industrialisation strategy that is likely to result in an increase in demand for power. While a number of power generation projects are on the cards or at different stages of development, the slow pace of commissioning these projects is putting more pressure on generation capacity. The current installed generation capacity in Sadc is 58 000MW out of which about 47 000MW is operating against a demand of around 53 000MW giving an operational deficit of around 6 000MW.The pace of commissioning new projects is still slow although the electricity deficit is expected to be overcome. This is despite that Sadc countries are endowed with different sources of energy which they not capitalised on through cross- border electricity trading.


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    Africa: AfDB Calls for a Revolution in Providing Energy Access Solutions


    The African Development Bank (AfDB) brought together more than 180 stakeholders across the off-grid energy sector on Tuesday, March 28, in the context of "Energy Week" at the Bank's headquarters in Abidjan to discuss interventions to support the scale-up of energy access investments. The overarching objective was to unleash an "Off-Grid Energy Revolution", to provide up to 75 million households and businesses not covered by the power grid with modern, clean and affordable electricity using decentralized solar technologies. During the plenary session of the Off-Grid Revolution consultation workshop, opening remarks were given by Bank President Akinwumi Adesina; the Minister of Oil, Energy and Energy Development of Côte d'Ivoire, Thierry Tanoh; and the Minister of Energy of the Republic of Sierra Leone, Henry Macauley. Africa's energy potential is as enormous as its electricity deficit. We must move quickly to unlock this energy potential. We must be smart, efficient, sustainable and quick in our actions.


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    West Africa: BioTherm Wins USTDA Grants for Ghana and Burkina Faso Projects

    South African firm BioTherm Energy received two grant awards in 2017 from the USTDA. As developer to Ghanaian company, Buipe Solar Ltd., the first of two official signing ceremonies saw the company receive a grant to support technical and environmental studies for a 20-MW solar PV plant in northern Ghana. Earlier in March, BioTherm was informed that it had also been awarded a grant, for a feasibility study for two 17-MW solar PV plants in Burkina Faso. An official signing ceremony is set to be held in Burkina Faso on April 4. For the Burkina Faso project, BioTherm will develop the plants on behalf of Société de Production d'Energie Solaire de Kodéni SAS. In both countries the studies will provide first class technical, environmental and social analysis among other things, ensuring that the solar projects meet international best practice standards. As an African developer receiving the second grant of this nature from USTDA, in under a year, is immensely encouraging,These grant awards clearly demonstrate continued confidence in BioTherm’s ability to deliver projects to world class standards.

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    Africa: Renewable energy has robust future in much of Africa

    Using resource mapping tools, a UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team assessed the potential for large solar and wind farms in 21 countries in the southern and eastern African power pools, which includes more than half of Africa’s population, stretching from Libya and Egypt in the north and along the eastern coast to South Africa. They concluded that with the right strategy for placing solar and wind farms, and with international sharing of power, most African nations could lower the number of conventional power plants – fossil fuel and hydroelectric – they need to build, thereby reducing their infrastructure costs by perhaps billions of dollars. The surprising find is that the wind and solar resources in Africa are absolutely gigantic, and something you could tap into for relatively low cost, But we need to be thinking now about strategies for fostering international collaboration to tap into the resource in a way that is going to maximize its potential while minimizing its impact. The main issue, is that energy-generating resources are not spread equally throughout Africa. Hydroelectric power is the main power source for one-third of African nations, but it is not available in all countries, and climate change makes it an uncertain resource because of more frequent droughts.


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    Kenya: EU Funding to Help Light Up Kenya

    Kenya’s renewable energy ambitions are set to receive a boost thanks to investments from the EU. Under a deal signed between the government of Kenya, EU banks, and development organizations Kenya will receive a funding package worth about €180 million. The new agreement will enable Kenya Power to connect many more ordinary households in 32 counties of Kenya to the national grid, using European bank soft loans and development funds to support the country's "Last Mile Connectivity" initiative. The total financial package was put together by the EU, the French Development Agency (AFD) and European Investment Bank (EIB). The Last Mile Connectivity initiative is a vital part of Kenya's development, It helps ensure that the national power grid reaches as many households as possible, so that ordinary Kenyan people have direct access to cheaper and more reliable supplies of electricity. The necessary investments aren't always commercially attractive, which is why the European Union has decided to support them with a major grant. The efforts of the Kenyan Government have led to an unprecedented number of new citizens accessing electricity each year. Kenya is now an example for the countries of the region. We are proud to have been supporting the Kenyan authorities along this exciting journey, and we are looking forward to continuing doing so


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    Africa: AFD Secures €24 Million from ElectrFI for Africa Projects

    In an effort to promote renewable energy projects and boost private investment in the on-grid and off-grid production of renewable energy in Africa, the AFD Group has secured €24 million. The funds are from the EU’s electrification funding initiative, ElectriFI. ElectriFI helps to harness and stimulate private sector investment to enhance access to renewable energy. More specifically, it focuses on poorly-served rural populations and regions that suffer from an unreliable electricity service. AFD Group has secured €24 million from the fund to deploy the African Renewable Energy Scale-Up (ARE Scale Up) facility. With the help of the EU, AFD Group will use this lending facility to partner the early-stage development of innovative electrification projects. While priority will be given to solar energy projects, other technologies (biomass, mini-hydro, etc.) will also be considered. ARE Scale-Up has been designed with a view to unlocking synergies between AFD and its private sector financing subsidiary, Proparco, and rallying stakeholders in both the public and private sectors. Of the €24 million allocation secured from the EU fund,€12 million will be used by AFD to provide technical assistance facilities to strengthen regulatory and institutional frameworks in the countries concerned and to prepare financing of private or public sector renewable energy initiatives in Africa.


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    Uganda to Tap Into Mini-grid Potential

    Uganda, which relies on hydropower for up to 84% for its electricity generation, is now exploring the option of scaling up mini-grids, both grid-connected and off-grid systems in a bid to achieve at least 26% rural electrification rate with at least 1.4 million home connections by 2022. The rural electrification plan gives priority to renewable energy mini-grid systems. However, the manager in charge of off-grid renewable energy at the state-owned Rural Electrification Agency (REA), Mr, Benon Bena, said faces several challenges that are being addressed by the Ministry of Energy in partnership with Uganda’s development partners and the private sector. The government has shifted focus to mini-grids, especially off-grid systems because Uganda, like many sub-Saharan Africa countries, has scattered settlements, which limit the number of people that can effectively be reached by the national grid.The delay to expand the national grids has on the other hand created a perfect opportunity for off-grid systems such as PV-hybrid (with diesel, small hydro, biomass or wind), PV-hybrid with batteries and PV only with battery systems in boosting access to electricity.


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    East Africa: Lamu, Tana River to Benefit From Sh15.9b Solar Power Project

    Lamu and Tana River are among 14 energy "underserved" counties set to benefit from a Sh15.9 billion solar power project this year. The Kenya-Off-grid Solar Access Project, which is fully funded by the World Bank, seeks to connect 430,000 off-grid households in the 14 counties. The project's main target is to increase access to energy services in all the specific underserved counties. Lamu and Tana River counties would have 46,695 homes covered with solar power. The project, also intends to ensure 15 secondary schools and 121 Level 2 and 3 health clinics in Lamu and Tana River counties get solar power. 18 county ward administrators and assistant county commissioners offices are among the beneficiaries of the solar power connections in the two counties. 95 solar pumping systems are also expected to be established in the region. The project also intends to provide solar power to the water sector so that places where residents rely on generators to pump water will be replaced with solar power. A place like Kiwayu in Lamu East where the county has a water project powered by a diesel engine will now be substituted with solar which is cheaper. The project, once complete, will make water more accessible to our communities


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    Africa: EU, French Agency Launch Africa’s Renewable Energy Project

    In order to meet Africa’s constantly increasing energy requirements, support must be provided for mass development of the renewable energy technologies – especially solar energy – that will play such a key role over the coming years, given the recent drop in prices and the emergence of new innovative business models. The parties launched the project today in Geneva Switzerland at the sideline of the African CEO Forum. The EU’s electrification funding initiative, “ElectriFI”, helps to harness and stimulate private sector investment to enhance access to renewable energy. More specifically, it focuses on poorly-served rural populations and regions that suffer from an unreliable electricity service. AFD Group has secured €24 million from the fund to deploy the African Renewable Energy Scale-Up (ARE Scale Up) facility. With the help of the European Union, AFD Group will use this lending facility to partner the early-stage development of innovative electrification projects. While priority will be given to solar energy projects, other technologies (biomass, mini-hydro, etc.) will also be considered. ARE Scale-Up has been designed with a view to unlocking synergies between AFD and its private sector financing subsidiary, Proparco, and rallying stakeholders in both the public and private sectors. Of the €24 million allocation secured from the EU fund


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    Ethiopia: Investing in Energy - Promising Development

    In order to meet the rising demand of electricity, Ethiopia has continued cultivating its immense potential of renewable energy sources such as hydro power, wind, solar energy and geothermal energy. The nation is the source of several river basins that are helpful to develop electric power- clean power generation. For instance, the Nile, the longest river in the world, gets about 85 per cent of its waters from the Blue Nile which originates from Ethiopia. There are also huge potentials of non-renewable energy resources such as natural gas and coal energy in the nation.The increasing demand of power to commensurate economic growth the country has been pursuing necessitates high investment in the energy sector. Hence, the nation has been working aggressively to increase the power supply reliability and generate foreign currency. It has set the target to reach the generation capacity 17, 208 MW at the end of the second Growth Transformation Plan (GTP-II). As the journey to this target, 4,828 MW from hydro power, 324 MW from wind power, 50 MW from urban solid wastes, 252 MW from sugar factories, 7 MW from geothermal energy, 120 MW from biomass and 87 MW emergency generation, in total 5,670 MW generation capacity was planned at the end of 2008 E.C.


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    Morocco, Here comes the Sun: Solar Power Finance for the 21st Century

    Solar power, along with other renewables, needs better access to finance if it is to meet its potential as a facilitator of decarbonisation and climate change mitigation. But in the 21st century, how are governments and financial institutions approaching the financial challenge of supporting solar energy growth worldwide? Solar power, along with onshore and offshore wind, is one of the most mature and promising renewable energy sources available. And because solar photovoltaic (PV) panels work well in small off-grid applications as well as medium-sized and larger projects, it is also particularly well-suited to the decarbonisation efforts of developing countries, many of which have access to ample reliable solar resources. But as with any green energy source, access to finance for new projects is essential to push solar adoption to new heights, as recognised in a recent report published in January by trade association SolarPower Europe.There will always be some households and businesses with enough spare cash to be able to self-fund solar PV projects,” the report noted. “But finance is what will allow solar to be accessible to a maximum number of power consumers and application segments if sufficiently attractive business models and projects can be put forward.


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    Mali to Receive US$25mn Loan to Build Solar Photovoltaic Plant

    The African Development Bank (AfDB) Board of Directors has approved a concessional loan of US$25mn to fund the Segou Solar PV Project, which is set to be Mali’s first utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant. The project will be funded by the Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) of the Climate Investment Funds (CIF), with co-financing from the AfDB (US$8.4mn) and International Finance Corporation (US$8.4mn). The project consists of the design, construction, and operations of a 33 MW Power Plant. The transformational project will lead to a direct increase in the country’s installed capacity from a renewable resource and will generate 52.7 GWh annually (approximately 10 per cent of the current generation capacity) over 25 years for a lifetime output of 1,316.75 GWh. Introducing utility-scale solar PV as an energy source will enable Mali to harness its abundant solar energy potential, diversify the country’s energy mix, and increase access to cleaner energy for its citizens. The project’s specific business model is a potential energy game-changer for Mali and indeed for all of West Africa. The project is a demonstration of the significant role that concessional climate finance can play in mitigating project specific risks and in addressing barriers that would otherwise hinder private sector involvement in renewable energy projects.


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    Kenya, Africa’s Green Energy Challenge: Mega Projects, Off-Grid or Somewhere in Between?

    A 310-megawatt wind farm sprouting up in a remote, barren landscape near Lake Turkana in northern Kenya has the clean energy world buzzing — and for good reason. Africa’s largest wind farm, with 365 towering turbines, is creating more than 500 stable jobs in an impoverished area where goat herding is often the only work available. It will boost Kenya’s electric grid capacity by about 15 percent, at a far lower cost than the imported oil the local utility now uses. And when it begins producing juice next year, it will signal to investors and companies that big clean energy projects like this are viable in sub-Saharan Africa. “The impact we’re having makes me feel quite proud, frankly,” says Phylip Leferink, general manager of Lake Turkana Wind Power, who was all smiles when I met with him because the 142nd turbine had just been installed. Megaprojects like these are deeply important for solving sub-Saharan Africa’s colossal energy access challenges at the pace governments there want. But they are not the complete answer.


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    Morocco: How Morocco tapped into Africa's Renewable Energy Potential

    Providing reliable, affordable and sustainable access to energy has become a core focus of the international development community and is the seventh goal of the 2015 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Roughly 1.2 billion people, or 17 percent of the global population, are energy poor, meaning that they have no access to electricity. Meanwhile, more than 2.7 billion people, primarily in developing Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, rely on fuelwood and other traditional biomass sources for cooking. Morocco’s experience with solar power offers key lessons for policymakers elsewhere in Africa who are seeking a robust pathway for addressing energy access challenges.Electricity plays an essential role in advancing social and economic development goals. Yet across Africa, an estimated 600 million people still lack energy access. In 38 of the 49 sub-Saharan African countries, at least half of the population lives without electricity. The region’s overall electrification rate is about 35 percent, with large disparities between urban (63 percent electricity access) and rural populations (19 percent access).


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    Nigeria: Green Energy Tech on the Rise

    The National Power Training Institute of Nigeria (NAPTIN) has declared that in partnership with an indigenous technology firm, Tido Tech International, they are planning to establish a national climate innovation centre, aimed at advancing green energy technology in the west African country. Local media THISDAY cited a statement from NAPTIN’s acting director general, Ahmed Nagode, confirming that a memorandum of understanding for the establishment of the climate innovation centre was recently signed between the two companies. It is reported that the main objective for the establishment of the centre is to foster a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) framework in the promotion of green energy technology in Nigeria.both parties would identify key stakeholders that could work with it in the establishment and effective operation of the centre, clearly define the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders in the project, undertake a feasibility study on the operations of the centre with a view to identify a suitable business model for its operation, as well as identify sources of funds for the operation of the centre


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    Mali to Receive $25 Million Concessional Loan to Build Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Plant and Transform the West African Energy Market

    The African Development Bank (AfDB) Board of Directors has approved a senior concessional loan of $25 million to fund the Segou Solar PV Project, Mali's first utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant. The project, one of the first in Sub-Saharan Africa, consists of the design, construction and operations of a 33 MW Power Plant. The transformational project will lead to a direct increase in the country's installed capacity from a renewable resource and will generate 52.7 GWh annually (approximately 10% of the current generation capacity) over 25 years for a lifetime output of 1,316.75 GWh. The project will be funded by the Program for Scaling Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP) of the Climate Investment Funds (CIF), with co-financing from the AfDB (US $8.4 million) and International Finance Corporation (US $8.4 million).


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